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Catholic Charities Social Concerns

 

The Catholic Charities Department of Social Concerns promotes Catholic social teaching which Catholic Charities is founded upon.  The staff of the Social Concerns Department encourages the Catholic community at large to consider what it means to live the Gospel message of love.  We challenge parishes and individuals to put faith into action by living Catholic social teaching.
 

Catholic Social Teaching

Catholic social teaching is a central and essential element of our faith. It is based on and inseparable from our understanding of human life and human dignity. Catholic social teaching is built on a commitment to the poor and vulnerable. It calls us all to reach out and to build relationships of compassion and justice. It calls us all to defend the dignity of life and promote the common good.


In these brief reflections, we present the key themes that lie at the heart of our Catholic social tradition:
 

Life and Dignity of the Human Person
Our belief in the sanctity of human life is the foundation of Catholic social teaching. We believe that every person is created in the image of God and that life must be protected and supported from conception to natural death. We assert that the measure of every institution is whether it threatens or enhances the life and dignity of the human person.

 

Call to Family, Community, Participation
How we organize our society – in economics and politics, in law and policy – directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community. We are social beings. We realize our dignity and human potential in our families and communities. Since the family is the basic unit of society, it must be supported and strengthened. Government has the mission of protecting human life, promoting the common good of all persons, and defending the right and duty of all to participate in social life.

 

Rights and Responsibilities
The Catholic tradition teaches that human dignity can be protected and a healthy community can be achieved only if human rights are protected and responsibilities are met. The Church upholds both personal responsibility and social rights. The right to life is fundamental and includes a right to food, clothing, shelter, rest, medical care, and essential social services. Every person has the right to raise a family and the duty to support them. Human dignity demands religious and political freedom as well as the duty to exercise these rights for the common good of all persons.

 

Option for the Poor and Vulnerable
Catholic teaching proclaims that a basic moral test of society is how its most vulnerable members are faring. The Church does not pit one social group against another but instead follows the example of our Lord, who identified himself with the poor and vulnerable (Matthew 25:31-46). Giving primary concern to the poor and the vulnerable strengthens the health of the whole society.

 

The Dignity of Work and Rights of Workers
We believe that the economy must serve people, not the other way around, and that work is a form of continuing participation in God's creation. To uphold the dignity of work, the rights of workers must be upheld. The rights to productive work, to fair and livable wages, to organize and join unions, and to economic initiative all contribute to full human development.

 

Solidarity
We are one human family, whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic or ideological differences. The Church speaks of a “universal” common good that reaches beyond our nation’s borders to the global community. Solidarity recognizes that the fates of the peoples of the earth are linked. Solidarity requires richer nations to aid poorer ones, commands respect for different cultures, demands justice in international relationships, and calls on all nations to live in peace with one another.

 

Care for God's Creation
The Catholic tradition insists that we show respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation. We are called to protect people and our planet, living our faith in harmony with all of God's creation. Our commitment to the common good and our concern for neighbors and for future generations require responsible stewardship of our natural resources.

This information has been adapted from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, “Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions,” June 1999.


Catholic Charities CCHD Information 

Related Links 

The staff of Catholic Charities Social Concerns is well-versed in the language of Catholic social teaching and the social mission of the Gospel.  Staff is available for reflections or presentations at weekend liturgies, workshops, adult education sessions and retreats.
Presentation Topics
  • Catholic Social Teaching - Many say this is the “best-kept secret” in the Catholic Church, yet according to Catholic tradition, this is one of the three essential ministries of the Church. 
  • Parish Social Ministry - An exploration of what it means to build the Kingdom of God in the world based on the USCCB document, Communities of Salt and Light. Participants will be trained and supported to live Catholic social teaching in their parishes and communities.
  • Catholic Campaign for Human Development - Learn more about the Church’s efforts to fight poverty in the U.S.
  • Immigration - Explore the recent Minnesota Bishops’ statement on immigration, as well as local demographics, common myths, and implications for our parish communities.
  • Poverty - Explore the reality of poverty on the local and national level.
  • Faithful Citizenship: How to Vote Catholic? - Church documents will be explored to determine what voting and political involvement means for Catholics.
  • Various Rural Life topics
  • Additional presentations are available upon request. Please contact Catholic Charities staff for more information.
Resources available from the Social Concerns Department

Related Links:
The Diocese of St. Cloud
Catholic Charities USA
Catholic Campaign for Human Development
Poverty USA
Pope Benedict's Encyclical: On Christian Love - God is Love
Minnesota Catholic Conference
National Catholic Rural Life Conference
USCCB Office of Justice, Peace and Human Development
Office of Social Justice, Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis
Justice for Immigrants
Catholic Coalition on Climate Change


NEW Resources!

Bishop Donald Kettler recently published his Pastoral Letter,
"Be Merciful, As Your Father is Merciful."
Click here to read the letter

****
 
On December 8th, 2015, the 50th anniversary of the closing of Vatican II, the Jubilee Year of Mercy began, as requested by Pope Francis. Join us in celebrating this special year!
CLICK HERE for resources from the Department of Social Concerns 
****
Immigration Sunday was celebrated on January 3.
Click here for a concise resource on "Immigration Myths"

En Español aquí
****
Syrian Refugee Crisis resources here
****
In May of 2015 Pope Francis released his encyclical "Laudato Si," or "On Care for Our Common Home." 
Resources for study and information can be found here.

Bulletin Reflections
 
Kathy Langer
Director of Social Concerns
Ph  320.229.6020
klanger@ccstcloud.org

JoAnn Braegelman
Rural Life Coordinator, Western Region
jbraegelman@ccstcloud.org

Melanie Gothman
Rural Life Coordinator, Eastern Region
mgothman@ccstcloud.org

Doug Scott
Community Organizer
Ph   320.293.8975
dscott@ccstcloud.org

Social Concerns Intern
Ph   320.650.1657
socialconcernsintern@ccstcloud.org
  • The Catholic Charities Department of Social Concerns promotes Catholic social teaching which Catholic Charities is founded upon.  The staff of the Social Concerns Department encourages the Catholic community at large to consider what it means to live the Gospel message of love.  We challenge parishes and individuals to put faith into action by living Catholic social teaching.
     

    Catholic Social Teaching

    Catholic social teaching is a central and essential element of our faith. It is based on and inseparable from our understanding of human life and human dignity. Catholic social teaching is built on a commitment to the poor and vulnerable. It calls us all to reach out and to build relationships of compassion and justice. It calls us all to defend the dignity of life and promote the common good.


    In these brief reflections, we present the key themes that lie at the heart of our Catholic social tradition:
     

    Life and Dignity of the Human Person
    Our belief in the sanctity of human life is the foundation of Catholic social teaching. We believe that every person is created in the image of God and that life must be protected and supported from conception to natural death. We assert that the measure of every institution is whether it threatens or enhances the life and dignity of the human person.

     

    Call to Family, Community, Participation
    How we organize our society – in economics and politics, in law and policy – directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community. We are social beings. We realize our dignity and human potential in our families and communities. Since the family is the basic unit of society, it must be supported and strengthened. Government has the mission of protecting human life, promoting the common good of all persons, and defending the right and duty of all to participate in social life.

     

    Rights and Responsibilities
    The Catholic tradition teaches that human dignity can be protected and a healthy community can be achieved only if human rights are protected and responsibilities are met. The Church upholds both personal responsibility and social rights. The right to life is fundamental and includes a right to food, clothing, shelter, rest, medical care, and essential social services. Every person has the right to raise a family and the duty to support them. Human dignity demands religious and political freedom as well as the duty to exercise these rights for the common good of all persons.

     

    Option for the Poor and Vulnerable
    Catholic teaching proclaims that a basic moral test of society is how its most vulnerable members are faring. The Church does not pit one social group against another but instead follows the example of our Lord, who identified himself with the poor and vulnerable (Matthew 25:31-46). Giving primary concern to the poor and the vulnerable strengthens the health of the whole society.

     

    The Dignity of Work and Rights of Workers
    We believe that the economy must serve people, not the other way around, and that work is a form of continuing participation in God's creation. To uphold the dignity of work, the rights of workers must be upheld. The rights to productive work, to fair and livable wages, to organize and join unions, and to economic initiative all contribute to full human development.

     

    Solidarity
    We are one human family, whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic or ideological differences. The Church speaks of a “universal” common good that reaches beyond our nation’s borders to the global community. Solidarity recognizes that the fates of the peoples of the earth are linked. Solidarity requires richer nations to aid poorer ones, commands respect for different cultures, demands justice in international relationships, and calls on all nations to live in peace with one another.

     

    Care for God's Creation
    The Catholic tradition insists that we show respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation. We are called to protect people and our planet, living our faith in harmony with all of God's creation. Our commitment to the common good and our concern for neighbors and for future generations require responsible stewardship of our natural resources.

    This information has been adapted from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, “Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions,” June 1999.


    Catholic Charities CCHD Information 

    Related Links 

  • Kathy Langer
    Director of Social Concerns
    Ph  320.229.6020
    klanger@ccstcloud.org

    JoAnn Braegelman
    Rural Life Coordinator, Western Region
    jbraegelman@ccstcloud.org

    Melanie Gothman
    Rural Life Coordinator, Eastern Region
    mgothman@ccstcloud.org

    Doug Scott
    Community Organizer
    Ph   320.293.8975
    dscott@ccstcloud.org

    Social Concerns Intern
    Ph   320.650.1657
    socialconcernsintern@ccstcloud.org
  • NEW Resources!

    Bishop Donald Kettler recently published his Pastoral Letter,
    "Be Merciful, As Your Father is Merciful."
    Click here to read the letter

    ****
     
    On December 8th, 2015, the 50th anniversary of the closing of Vatican II, the Jubilee Year of Mercy began, as requested by Pope Francis. Join us in celebrating this special year!
    CLICK HERE for resources from the Department of Social Concerns 
    ****
    Immigration Sunday was celebrated on January 3.
    Click here for a concise resource on "Immigration Myths"

    En Español aquí
    ****
    Syrian Refugee Crisis resources here
    ****
    In May of 2015 Pope Francis released his encyclical "Laudato Si," or "On Care for Our Common Home." 
    Resources for study and information can be found here.

    Bulletin Reflections
     
  • The staff of Catholic Charities Social Concerns is well-versed in the language of Catholic social teaching and the social mission of the Gospel.  Staff is available for reflections or presentations at weekend liturgies, workshops, adult education sessions and retreats.
    Presentation Topics
    • Catholic Social Teaching - Many say this is the “best-kept secret” in the Catholic Church, yet according to Catholic tradition, this is one of the three essential ministries of the Church. 
    • Parish Social Ministry - An exploration of what it means to build the Kingdom of God in the world based on the USCCB document, Communities of Salt and Light. Participants will be trained and supported to live Catholic social teaching in their parishes and communities.
    • Catholic Campaign for Human Development - Learn more about the Church’s efforts to fight poverty in the U.S.
    • Immigration - Explore the recent Minnesota Bishops’ statement on immigration, as well as local demographics, common myths, and implications for our parish communities.
    • Poverty - Explore the reality of poverty on the local and national level.
    • Faithful Citizenship: How to Vote Catholic? - Church documents will be explored to determine what voting and political involvement means for Catholics.
    • Various Rural Life topics
    • Additional presentations are available upon request. Please contact Catholic Charities staff for more information.
    Resources available from the Social Concerns Department

    Related Links:
    The Diocese of St. Cloud
    Catholic Charities USA
    Catholic Campaign for Human Development
    Poverty USA
    Pope Benedict's Encyclical: On Christian Love - God is Love
    Minnesota Catholic Conference
    National Catholic Rural Life Conference
    USCCB Office of Justice, Peace and Human Development
    Office of Social Justice, Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis
    Justice for Immigrants
    Catholic Coalition on Climate Change


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